So School Speech Lady

Diana Clemmons, Ed. S., CCC/SLP
Clemmons.Diana.L@muscogee.k12.ga.us

Elementary School-Age


Welcome! This website is designed as a resource to help parents provide extra support at home for areas their child is working on in speech therapy, such as articulation, language skills, voice, and fluency.

                                  ARTICULATION
Below are some links to books on www.youtube.com that can be used to help your child practice his or her speech sounds. Listen to each story once through at least once, but preferably two or three times. Below are some ways you can practice the speech sound in the context of the book. Don't think you have to let the video read the story. You can turn off the volume and read it yourself. Pause the video as needed to ask questions and discuss the story and the pictures.

  • Ask your child to tell you each time he or she hears a word with their sound.
  • After each page is read, talk about that part of the story.
  • Ask questions that will require them to use a word containing their target sound. After your child is familiar with the story, act have them act the story out. You can even make sock or paper bag puppets for them to use to act out the story.
 Also included are extension activities and videos that you can discuss with your child to help them practice their sounds in more realistic contexts.

                                 VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT
Several of the books below are full of great vocabulary words. Have your child identify the words he or she doesn't know, and then explain each word to them on their level. Pick one or two words per day from the story and use them several times in different sentences so they can see how they are used. You can make a game of seeing how many times during the day they can correctly use a new word they learned. Be sure you use the word too, throughout the day when talking with them. For even more practice, you can have your child complete pages 4, 5, 6 or 7 (one only) of this pdf to help with learning each word.

                           WH QUESTIONS AND STORY GRAMMAR
For each story, also ask plenty of "wh" questions (who, what, where, when and why) to make sure they are comprehending the story. Ask about who the characters are, the setting (time and place) of the story, what the problem in the story is, how do the characters feel about the problem, how are the characters planning on solving the problem, did their plan work, and how did the story end. These kinds of activities will help expand their language skills greatly. If your child struggles with understanding what each type of "wh" is asking, you can use the visual cues here to help. Just scroll down the page a little to get to the graphic. You can talk about how "who" questions require a person or character as the answer, "where" questions require a place as the answer, etc. If this is still really difficult, consider only focusing on one type of "wh" question while discussing the story.

                       AUGMENTATIVE/ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION
The books listed below can be a great jumping-off point for teaching students using an AAC device new vocabulary to access on their device. The key for beginning AAC users is for the adults to model using the device while answering their own questions about the story. Before reading the book together, read through the book yourself and pick three to four words you would like to teacher your child. Find those words on your child's device.  Think of questions you can ask while reading the story whose answer will be the target word, then ask those questions while reading the story with your child. After asking the question, model how to find the answer on the device. the next day, re-read the story and ask similar questions and see if they can answer with the device. If not, continue modeling until they can answer on their own. Be patient. It may take several times before they learn where the word is. Watch Me Throw the Ball is a great book to start with. There are only a few words on each page and the story is simple yet engaging.

                        INCREASING SENTENCE LENGTH AND COMPLEXITY
Books that are very repetitive can be helpful in helping students learn to increase the length of their sentences and to improve their grammar. The Grouchy Ladybug, Watch Me Throw the Ball, and Today I Will Fly are some examples of such books. Read the book through the first time, without asking any questions or requiring any response. The next day, read through the first few pages and then start reading the majority of one of the repetitious sentences, but stop one or two words short of reading the whole sentence, and wait expectantly to see if your child will finish the sentence. Once you see they are successful with this task, gradually increase the words you leave out and see if they can finish the sentence. If they try, but leave out words or make other errors, repeat the sentence correctly as a model. If they offer no response after waiting a second or two, you can complete the sentence yourself and then move on with the story, but continue to pause with expectation to give your child a chance to finish the sentence.

                              SOCIAL SKILLS
The book, Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs is one of my favorite books to read with students with social skills issues. The book is full of inferences both in the text and the pictures, sarcasm, and other concepts that can be difficult. Be sure to go through the story several times by yourself before reading it with the student. Look for social mistakes made by Goldilocks, areas where the student will need to make inferences to understand the story (double check the pictures for clues as well).., and uses of figurative language that will need to be explained. After you and your child have reviewed the story several times and they appear to understand the story you can do some compare and contrast with the story Goldilocks and the Three Bears" and/or have them make up their own story of Goldilocks and three other characters. The inside covers of the book are full of ideas for this. They can illustrate the book as well. You can also use this activity to discuss the parts of a story (characters, setting (time and place), problem in the story, how the characters feel about the problem, the characters' solution for the problem, how does their plan to solve the problem work, and the conclusion of the story.

                         FLUENCY
The Stuttering Foundation has a lot of great resources to learn about stuttering.
Here is a list of things you as a parent can do to help your child's fluency. Use them as you read and discuss the books below.

Watch 7 Tips for Talking with the Child Who Stutters 

Experts agree that most children who stutter benefit from taking time to speak at a rate that promotes fluency. These guidelines represent a number of ways that adults around that child can help promote the child’s fluency.

1. Reduce the pace. Speak with your child in an unhurried way, pausing frequently. Wait a few seconds after your child finishes before you begin to speak. Your own easy relaxed speech will be far more effective than any advice such as “slow down” or “try it again slowly. For some children, it is also helpful to introduce a more relaxed pace of life for awhile.

2. Full listening. Try to increase those times that you give your child your undivided attention and are really listening. This does not mean dropping everything every time she speaks.

3. Asking questions. Asking questions is a normal part of life – but try to resist asking one after the other. Sometimes it is more helpful to comment on what your child has said and wait.

4. Turn taking. Help all members of the family take turns talking and listening. Children find it much easier to talk when there are fewer interruptions.

5. Building confidence. Use descriptive praise to build confidence. An example would be “I like the way you picked up your toys. You’re so helpful,” instead of “that’s great.” Praise strengths unrelated to talking as well such as athletic skills, being organized, independent, or careful.

6. Special times. Set aside a few minutes at a regular time each day when you can give your undivided attention to your child. This quiet calm time – no TV, iPad or phones - can be a confidence builder for young children. As little as five minutes a day can make a difference.

7. Normal rules apply. Discipline the child who stutters just as you do your other children and just as you would if he didn’t stutter.

Also, here is downloadable fluency packet to use. Just sign up for www.teacherspayteachers.com to be able to access.

Last of all, don't feel like you have to do all of the activities for a particular book in one day. One small activity per day can make a huge impact on your child's communication skills. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact your child's speech language pathologist.

GENERAL PACKETS TO DOWNLOAD
SLPNow has parent friendly packets to download using books available on youtube and cover most areas of speech and language.
SLPNow.com

Click here to download articulation sheets for /skw, spl, str, spr, skr/ blends.

SKW words 
Squish Rabbit
Brave Squish Rabbit
A Squash and a Squeeze

Games/ Activities (see how many times you can use the word in bold during the activity. Can you think out any other words containing the /skw/ sound?)
1. Squeezing frosting on cookies
2. Squishing/ squeezing plush toys
3. Print articulation sheets for this sound and make articulation cards. Make two sets to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sounds.

Videos
Sesame Street: Squid Says the Alphabet
Squid Brian Williams

THR
Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs
Watch Me Throw the Ball

Games/ Activities - make sure to ask questions that require your child to use thr words.
  • Throwing a basketball through a hoop- (throw, threw, through)
  • Pushing cars through cardboard tube (through)
  • Kids climbing through a collapsible tunnel (through)
  • Throw bean bag on cards (throw high, throw low, etc)
  • Looking through binoculars for cards (through)
  • Bean bag toss (through, threw)
  • Thread beads (thread, through, three)
  • Print the THR articulation sheet below to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

Videos
Count Counting Sheep
Number of the Day (Number of the Day)
Globe Trotters (Globe Trotters)
Downloadable THR articulation sheet

SPL
Splat the Cat
Splat the Cat Sings Flat

Games/Activities- (see how many times you can use the word in bold during the activity. Can you think out any other words containing the /spl/ sound?)VideosFR
The Red Eyed Tree Frog
My Friends
The Umbrella

VideosDownloadable FR articulation sheet

Games/ Activities
  • Freeze tag "(I froze you!", "You are free!")
  • Draw types of fruit or make with play dough. (Say, "A banana is a fruit", etc)
  • "FR" word scavenger hunt
  • Print the THR articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.
STR
Mr. Strong
A Bad Case of Stripes

Games/ Activities- (see how many times you can use the word in bold during the activity. Can you think out any other words containing the /thr/ sound?)
  • Threading beads
  • Blowing with straws
  • Picking things up "(I am strong!")
  • STR Worksheets
  • Make chain garland (strips)
  • 3. Print articulation sheets for this sound and make articulation cards. Make two sets to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sounds.
VideosFL
The Grouchy Ladybug
Cows Can't Fly
Today I Will Fly!

Games/ Activities
  • Jumping Monkeys (flip, fling, flop, fly, flew)
  • Make paper airplanes
  • Pretend you are flying on airplane (flip, fling, flop, fly, flew) 
  • Print the FL articulation sheet below to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.
VideosDownloadable FL articulation sheet

CH
Online Books
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
Itchy, Itchy Chicken Pox

Online Videos
Learn How to Say CH
ch | Fun Phonics | How to Read | Made by Kids vs Phonics
Let's Learn About the Digraph ch 

Downloadable Articulation Sheets for CH
Print the CH articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

F
The Gingerbread Man
The Foot Book
The Rainbow Fish

Online Videos
Learn How to Say F
Sesame Street Letter of the Day F
F is For Fox
Sesame Street The Number of the Day 5

Downloadable Articulation Sheet for F
Print the F articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

G
When the Goose Got Loose
Three Billy Goats Gruff
Go Away, Big Green Monster

Online Videos
Sesame Street: Song - Super Grover with a "G"
Sesame Street G

Downloadable Articulation Sheets for G
Print the G articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

K
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Have You Seen My Cat?
Three Little Kittens

Extension Activities
You can make various crafts using scissors and glue.Click here for a cat craft.  During the activity, have your child ask for their supplies (scissors, glue, crayons etc). Ask why they need scissors ("So I cancut paper.") Think of other questions you can use to elicit the /k/ sound during the activity. When they are finished, have them describe how they made their craft.

Online Videos
Learn How to Say K
Letter of the Day K
Things That Start with K
Sesame Street: Cookie Monster Sings C is for Cookie

Downloadable Articulation Sheet for K
Print the K articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

L
The Grouchy Ladybug
Is Your Mama a Llama?
The Wee Little Woman

Online Videos
Learn How to Say L
Sesame Street Letter of the Day L
Sesame Street Cookie's Letter of the Day L

Downloadable Articulation Sheets for L
Print the L articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

S
Silly Sally
Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?
The Day the Goose Got Loose

Online Videos
Learn How to Say S
Sesame Street Letter of the Day S
Sesame Street The Number of the Day 7

Downloadable Articulation Sheets for S
Print the S articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

SH
Shoo Fly! 
The Shape of Me and Other Stuff
The Rainbow Fish

Online Videos
Let's Learn About the Digraph sh 
The SH Sound | Phonics Video | Scratch Garden
Learn How to Say SH

Downloadable Articulation Sheets for SH
Print the SH articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

TH
Downloadable Articulation Sheets for TH
Print the TH articulation sheet above to make articulation cards. Print and make two copies to play Go Fish or Memory while practicing the sound. You can also hide the cards and have them hunt them and say them as the cards are found.

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Elementary School-AgeElementary School-Age

Middle and High School


Middle and High School
This page is for speech and language activities for middle and high school students.
 Speech Time Fun,  provides a list of common games that can be used to strengthen language skills.
Below are other ideas you can use based on your student's current class assignments.

ARTICULATION
Have your student take one page from a reading assignment and identify all of the words on that page that contain the sound they are working on in speech. Depending on how hard it is for them to pronounce the word, you can have them just repeat the word after you, have them read each word slowly on their own, have them read that word and one or two words that are after it on the page, have them read the whole sentence, or the whole page. If they cannot produce the sound correctly at least half of the time, go down a level.

VOCABULARY
Have the student pick five vocabulary words from any subject. Use any of the graphic organizers from this page to define, describe, and use the word. I personally like pages, 4-7 the best for this. Look the word up in the dictionary together, and if needed you can rephrase the definition in your own words. Have them do the same. Use the word in several different sentences for your child and then have them use the word in a few sentences. When they have mastered these first 5 words,  you can move on to five more words and repeat the process. You can use free online resources as well, such as Quizlet to created flashcards for practice.

Games like Tribond, Apples to Apples, and Taboo are great games to work on vocabulary.

GENERALSPEECH/ LANGUAGE SKILLS
SLPNow has free, parent friendly packets that you can download and address most areas of speech and language.

SOCIAL SKILLS
Social Thinking has several free webinars to help you learn more about teaching social competencies to your child, along with ideas about how to incorporate them. The site also has numerous articles that you may find helpful.

Below are a few videos on www.youtube.com on social skills/social thinking that you can view with your child.

Social Skills Video: Think it Or Say It
Expected and Unexpected Behaviors
Tips on Making New Friends
Listening with Your Body
Size of the Problem

The videos above can be used as conversation starters about behaviors that we expect from others and behaviors that are unexpected and make others feel uncomfortable.

FLUENCY
The Stuttering Foundation has a lot of great resources to learn about stuttering.
Here is a list of things you, as a parent, can do to help your child's fluency.

Watch 7 Tips for Talking with the Child Who Stutters 

Experts agree that most children who stutter benefit from taking time to speak at a rate that promotes fluency. These guidelines represent a number of ways that adults around that child can help promote the child’s fluency.

1. Reduce the pace. Speak with your child in an unhurried way, pausing frequently. Wait a few seconds after your child finishes before you begin to speak. Your own easy relaxed speech will be far more effective than any advice such as “slow down” or “try it again slowly. For some children, it is also helpful to introduce a more relaxed pace of life for awhile.

2. Full listening. Try to increase those times that you give your child your undivided attention and are really listening. This does not mean dropping everything every time she speaks.

3. Asking questions. Asking questions is a normal part of life – but try to resist asking one after the other. Sometimes it is more helpful to comment on what your child has said and wait.

4. Turn taking. Help all members of the family take turns talking and listening. Children find it much easier to talk when there are fewer interruptions.

5. Building confidence. Use descriptive praise to build confidence. An example would be “I like the way you picked up your toys. You’re so helpful,” instead of “that’s great.” Praise strengths unrelated to talking as well such as athletic skills, being organized, independent, or careful.

6. Special times. Set aside a few minutes at a regular time each day when you can give your undivided attention to your child. This quiet calm time – no TV, iPad or phones - can be a confidence builder for young children. As little as five minutes a day can make a difference.

7. Normal rules apply. Discipline the child who stutters just as you do your other children and just as you would if he didn’t stutter.

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